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Sunday, August 16, 2020 | History

3 edition of Assessing the exposure of urban youth to violence found in the catalog.

Assessing the exposure of urban youth to violence

Assessing the exposure of urban youth to violence

a summary of a pilot study from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods.

  • 57 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice in [Washington, D.C.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Urban youth -- Crimes against,
  • Children and violence,
  • Victims of crimes

  • Edition Notes

    Shipping list no.: 97-0065-P.

    Other titlesPilot study from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods., National Institute of Justice research preview.
    ContributionsNational Institute of Justice (U.S.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination1 sheet.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17794062M
    OCLC/WorldCa36039468

    Early exposure. The risk of violence rises with exposure to aggressive family fights during childhood, physical abuse by a parent, or having a parent with a criminal record. Preventing violence The research suggests that adequate treatment of mental illness and substance abuse may help reduce rates of violence. Urban youth are faced with even more of these barriers such as homelessness, mental health issues, negative influences, poverty, racism, stereotypes and exposure to violence. Table 1 addresses these social psychological barriers, defines them and provides sources from current journal articles that speak about them.

    The behavioral threat assessment approach is the model currently used by the U.S. Secret Service to prevent violence to the U.S. president and other public officials, by the U.S. Capitol Police to prevent violence to members of Congress, by the U.S. State Department to prevent violence to dignitaries visiting the United States, and by the U.S. The effects of violence exposure on urban youth. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 38, Urban youth as witnesses to violence: Beginning assessment and treatment efforts. Journal of Youth and .

    The three assessment tools for childhood exposure to violence that were identified during this update have been added to the alphabetized overview of assessment tools, below, and Table 1. Behavioral Health Screen-Primary Care (BHS-PC) The BHS-PC is a self-report, internet-based assessment tool for adolescents and young adults. “marital violence,” and “interpersonal violence.” The problem is in adequately conceptualizing the violence in terms of type of violence (physical, psychological), specific acts, severity, type of perpetrator, frequency and timing. Another issue is how to best assess how a child exposed to violence perceives it.


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Assessing the exposure of urban youth to violence Download PDF EPUB FB2

Assessing Exposure to Violence in Urban Youth - Volume 39 Issue 2 - Mary Beth Selner-O'Hagan, Daniel J. Kindlon, Stephen L. Cited by: Assessing Exposure to Violence in Urban Youth. Mary Beth Selner‐O'Hagan. Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA.

Search for more papers by this author. (My ETV), that was designed to assess child and youth exposure to violence.

Eighty participants between the ages of 9 and 24 were assessed. Data from My ETV were fit to a Rasch model Cited by: Get this from a library.

Assessing the exposure of urban youth to violence: a summary of a pilot study from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods. [National Institute of Justice (U.S.);]. This paper reports on the results of a new method for assessing the exposure of urban youth to violence.

Abstract This research effort was part of the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods, which is a long-range study of the determinants of antisocial behavior, delinquency and crime, and substance abuse. More older (54%) than younger (29%) youth and more youth living in urban (51%) than rural (29%) areas were indirectly exposed to gun violence.

Among exposed youth, 50% took protective action to keep themselves safe including hiding somewhere until it was over and going a different way to get somewhere after the exposure.

This article explores an innovative approach in assessing community violence exposure with time-sampling methodology, where reporting occurs within daily accounts to provide a more immediate measure of community violence exposure. Method: Data were collected over 1 week from urban African American young adolescents (M age = years, SD.

Assessing Urban African American Youths' Exposure to Community Violence Through a Daily Sampling Method Article (PDF Available) in Psychology of Violence 5(3).

Assessing exposure to violence in urban youth. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. Feb; 39 (2)– [Google Scholar] Shakoor BH, Chalmers D. Co-victimization of African-American children who witness violence: effects on cognitive, emotional, and behavioral development.

A combination of individual, relationship, community, and societal factors contribute to the risk of youth violence. Research on youth violence has increased our understanding of factors that make some populations more vulnerable to victimization and perpetration.

Many risk factors for youth violence are linked to experiencing toxic stress, or. 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Prevalence of Violence in Urban Communities 3 Effects of Community Violence on Mental Health 5 Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) 5 PTSD in Urban Youth 6 Treatments for PTSD 7 Interventions and Programs Addressing Youth Violence and Mental Health 9 School Based Health Centers (SBHCs) 9 Federal Funded Activities Addressing the Affects of Violence.

measures to assess change in violence-related attitudes, beliefs, behaviors, and other influences. Monitoring and documenting proven strategies will go a long way toward reducing youth violence and creating peaceful, healthier communities.

Why Outcome Evaluations Are So Important In their desire to be responsive to constituents’. Received Ph.D. in clinical/community psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park, in Research interests include group therapy with adolescents, teenage parenting, social skills assessment and training, and development of programs to assess, prevent, and treat violence exposure in urban youth.

Youth Exposure to Violence in an Urban Setting David Seal, 1 Annie Nguyen, 2 and Kirsten Beyer 3 1 Global Community Health and Behavioral. Objectives: To assess youth perceptions of the causes and consequences of violence generally, the causes and consequences of fighting specifically, and to determine how best to approach fighting in the context of violence prevention activities.

Methods: Thirteen structured focus group interviews with youths from three high violence urban settings: a large, urban high school, a. O'Hagan MB, Kindlon DJ, Buka SL, Raudenbush SW, Earls FJ. Assessing exposure to violence in urban youth.

J Child Psychol Psychiatr All Dis ; Robins LN, Helzer JE, Cottler L, Goldring E. () The Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS) III-R. Washington University, St. Louis, MO. The responses to violence include seeking out non–violent friends, avoiding trouble, becoming resigned to the situation, striving to do well in school, or for some, retaliating physically, the authors said.

“Exposure to community violence is pervasive among youth in many urban neighborhoods. Assessing Exposure to Violence in Urban Youth Assessing Exposure to Violence in Urban Youth Selner‐O'Hagan, Mary Beth; Kindlon, Daniel J.; Buka, Stephen L.; Raudenbush, Stephen W.; Earls, Felton J.

Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, U.S.A. Stephen W. Raudenbush Michigan State University, East Lansing, U.S.A. Felton J. Assessing exposure to violence in urban youth. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 39, Exposure to violence has pervasive and deleterious effects on children that are just beginning to be understood by the mental health community.

The purpose ofthis study was to address the void in current research regarding potential moderating factors between exposure to violence and aggression in urban youth. A biopsychosocial model. No Safe Haven II: The Effects ofViolence Exposure on Urban Youth MARY SCHWAB-STONE, M.D., CHUANSHENG CHEN, PH.D., ELLEN GREENBERGER, PH.D., DAVID SILVER,JUDITH LICHTMAN, PH.D., AND CHARLENE VOYCE, M.P.H.

ABSTRACT Oblectlves: To examine the moderating effects of gender, grade level, and ethnicity on the associations between violence exposure. As such, it is not clear whether exposure to violence or the underlying measures of disadvantage are responsible for the poor child outcomes observed.

Using individual survey data on urban youth and their families from Los Angeles, we find that the most violent neighborhoods are also characterized by the highest degree of disadvantage: greatest.Search the world's most comprehensive index of full-text books. My library.Scholars, public officials, and reporters have described the violence of this decade as epidemic as the homicide rate has doubled for adolescents between and Current policy to combat youth violence is primarily reactive, focusing on increased punishments and spending millions of dollars each year on ing the latest research on effective 3/5(1).